Chesa Somvih, Zuoz

Chesa Somvih originates from 1540 and has since marked the northwestern corner of a historic village square.
The haybarn, which was orginally attached to the northside, was destroyed by an avalanche in 1951 and has never been replaced.
Otherwise, the building has survived in its original form without significant changes to the present day. The house corresponds to the characteristic Engadine farmhouse typology.
In the northeast corner of the house rises a three-storey masonry volume, which suggests a medieval tower structure.
The interior of the house is made captivating by the seemingly radical display of the elementary construction. The quarrystone walls of the cellar rooms are provided with a raw Pietra-Rasa plaster. On the ground floor, the timber construction of the Stüva remained unclad towards the Sulèr, directly confronted with the plastered masonry of kitchen and Chamineda. In the attic, next to the masonry tower, the wooden Chambra rises into the room.
In our renovation, we integrated an additional bedroom and two new bathrooms on the upper floor. This happened on the upper floor in exciting contrast to the historical components. The historic fireplace gives another interesting reference. A skylight over the two newly installed bathrooms provides a surprising lighting.